Street Talk Film Series

Street Talk TV produces 15 minute documentaries which reflect human experience and feelings on the issues and challenges of our time and society which are broadcast on Community Television and DSTV.

Street Talk is an innovative documentary series that present uninhibited conversation between participants in discussion groups in a spontaneous way so that the viewer apperas to sit in an empty chair in the circle, giving a sense of participation and involvement. Discussions are filmed in informal settings (shebeens, shacks, school classrooms, restaurants) which are both accessible to participants and situate the series in community settings. In 2010, Street Talk presented a new format in which the documentaries featured organisations and individuals who have a positive impact on their communities.

Read more

 

Episode tags Rights

  • SELECT A SEASON

Black kids in private schools

Season 8 Episode 16

Wed, 13 Sep 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm, Sat, 16 Sep 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm

 

Mothers of black kids at private schools discuss the pros and cons of the education their children are getting. Is there sufficient attempt to incorporate black culture ? Does sex education at school mean that parents don’t have to talk about it at home ? Does sparing the rod spoil the child?

Join the conversation!

Cultural crossfire

Season 8 Episode 6

Fri, 7 Jul 2017 12:00am 12:00 am

Young black Capetonians talk about how black people are leaving behind their traditional cultures,  how they are adapting  to western cultures and how woman are being caught in the crossfire.

Join the conversation!

Where are we Going?

Season 8 Episode 5

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm, Sat, 24 Jun 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm

Corruption, the cabinet reshuffle and ailing economy, racism and how the government controls the media . High school students talk about the future of South Africa.

Join the conversation!

Bullying

Season 7 Episode 52

Wed, 17 May 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm, Sat, 20 May 2017 12:00am 12:00 am

School bullying is a type of bullying that occurs either inside or outside of school. Bullying can be physical, verbal, or emotional and is usually repeated over a period of time.
In schools, bullying occurs in all areas. It can occur in nearly any part in or around the school building, though it more often occurs during school breaks, in hallways, bathrooms, on school buses and waiting for buses, classes that require group work and/or after school activities.

Bullying in school sometimes consists of a group of learners taking advantage of or isolating one learner in particular and gaining the loyalty of bystanders who want to avoid becoming the next victim.

Young school students from different backgrounds gather together to share their personal experiences of being bullied in and outside school premises.

Join the conversation

Interracial relationship part 4

Season 7 Episode 49

Fri, 19 May 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm

 

When it comes to interracial relationships, the people who’ve been there will tell you there can definitely be struggles.

5 woman gather together from interracial relationship to talk about attraction in an interracial relationships and the obstacles they encounter daily that they were not expecting.

 

Join the conversation

Children of the street

By Laura Delbrassinne

We meet them every day, but we do not pay special attention. They are for the most part very young, looking a little haggard, the look lost in the void. Often they run after us for a piece or a coca-cola. We think that this is normal, that they are children of the street and so much the worse for that. We hear some people say that “in any case, we can not save the whole earth” and “that it is a very sad situation”.
We do not worry especially for them because they know the street. They know how to get by.
They are mostly between 10 and 15 years old, but some are barely 4 or 5 years old. They have no family, no house, and scarcely enough food. They live alone, sometimes in a band, knowing very well that their father or mother is no longer there to woo them.

Theirs education? They get it themselves, over time, despite the risks. They know that at least the street speaks to them and listens to them. Traumatises, theirs only way out is to trust God. Only God has a lot of work and does not seem to pay much attention to those many children who run the streets in South Africa. The majority of them are orphans because of a devastating disease: AIDS, which today affects more than 30% of the South African national population.
The number of people with this disease is increasing every day and as a result, the number of orphans is also growing. Most of the time, the rest of the family can’t afford to continue to care and protect these children. They find themselves therefore books to themselves, with in their hands a future more than uncertain.
But what we see in their eyes when we meet their gaze is only a small glimpse of the suffering they suffer every day because of this sad reality. These orphans have considerable problems with their situation. The malnutrition they face is causing terrible delays in both physical and psychological growth.
These children suffer terrible trauma because they are often excluded from the community and even from health centers. Sex education in school is so weak that some still think that if only one person is sick of AIDS in a family, then everyone is contaminated. An absurd and totally false idea.

In addition, it is estimated that today, 29% of orphaned children have economic accreditation to survive. In the worst case, some prostitute at just 15 years for less than 7 dollars. These children have unprotected sex about 3 or 4 times a day.

This terrible situation is also a factor in the growth of AIDS in South Africa.

For these orphans, it is often easier to live on the streets rather than having to live in a host family or most of the time they receive neither attention nor affection.

And we know it very well, so that a child grows up and flourishes, he needs all possible love and a daily listening.

These orphans feel discriminated and different from other children because they do not have access to school. This has an enormous impact on their relations with the outside world. Faced with this extremely sensitive and catastrophic situation, these children react in different ways. One can see distress running through their extinct eyes, tired by a life already too difficult for such a young child.

They rarely talk about their situation. Fear, shame, deny … They think they are abnormal because they grow up alone. Some of them fall into alcohol, drugs, depression or aggression.

 

But if they are afraid to talk about it, it’s up to us to do it. It is up to us to sensitize the whole of South Africa so that in future years, the next generations do not know the same fate. If we talk about it, we will change things. It is still possible to improve the situation of these children. But to do this, we must first believe in it, stand up and fight together so that the street ceases to take charge of these thousands of little ones.

South Africa is growing every day a little more, leaving a whole generation of children in front of the firm doors of a stable and constructive future. It is urgent for the future of the country that things change, that the government should take responsibility for the education and protection of children. Every child who comes into the world must be able to enjoy the same opportunities as others.
It is not normal that thousands of children are running the streets in search of a better future.

To change the situation, immediate support is needed for families and local communities to ensure the health and safety of all these orphans. Provide these children with free basic education, giving them the opportunity to earn a living in a sustainable and safe way. There is a need for sex education in every school so that young people and adults understand the issues and especially the risks and dangers of AIDS. School is terribly important for every child. It should not be seen as a privilege, but as a common right for everyone.

South Africa has a wonderful new generation of children that it has to protect. For a better future, it is urgent that the country listen more attentively to the dreams and desires of each child so that they can in turn take care of their native land.

We tried to make a video report about the terrible situation of the orphan children but unfortunately they denied our request.

Zuma Phantsi!

Season 7 Episode 47

Wed, 12 Jul 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm, Sat, 15 Jul 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm

Thousands of people gear up to take to the streets across to voice their discontent about government and to call for President Jacob Zuma to step down.

A group of 6 protesters voice out why they were marching on Parliament on friday.

Join the Conversation!

Fire next time

Season 7 Episode 46

Wed, 5 Apr 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm, Sat, 8 Apr 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm

More than 200 people are without shelter after several informal structures in Mandela Park at Hout Bay were destroyed by fire. Residents gather together to talk about how the government is failing to provide necessary help regarding the fire incidents and the governments lack of communication with the people.

Join the conversation

Youth, Activating for Change Part 3

Season 7 Episode 39

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm, Sat, 18 Feb 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm

“The reason we don’t feel a sense of belonging is because we don’t understand ourselves first. ” Zilungile Zimela. You can’t build a society purely on interests, you need a sense of belonging.

This is a time for bold measures. This is the country, and the youth is the generation.

Join the conversation

Youth, Activating for Change Part 2

Season 7 Episode 38

Young people should be at the forefront of global change and innovation. Empowered, they can be key agents for development and peace. If, however, they are left on society’s margins, all of us will be impoverished. Let us ensure that all young people have every opportunity to participate fully in the lives of their societies.

It is the young peoples duty to go back to the communities try to equip were they can, and not waiting for the government to do something. “People who are subject to do something are not doing anything about it” Zilungile Zimela. The is a powerful potential in our youth, and we must have the courage to change old ideas and practices so that they may be directed their power toward good ends.

Join the conversation

Artscape Outreach: Reaching Out

Season 7 Episode 36

Wed, 25 Jan 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm, Sat, 28 Jan 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm

In October 2016, Cape Town’s very own Artscape Theater performed during a special outreach weekend in Clanwilliam. They brought in performers ranging from ballerinas, to hip hop dancers and opera singers. Showcasing their talents to a captivated audience, these performers were given to opportunity to share their love for artistic expression with township locals. Facilitated by Marlene le Roux, this is a highly anticipated event for the community and a multitude of young and old come out for the show.

Every performer has a unique outlook and approach to creativity. Some have even overcome physical disabilities to become professional dancers and are an inspiration for those who are lucky enough to watch their talents unfold onstage. Sharing these insights with individuals from township communities is crucial and, unfortunately, a very rare occurrence. Emphasis on music, art and performance takes a backstage to act of moving through lives filled with poverty, violence and inequality.

Yet, there is merit in creative self-expression that offers a chance to transcend or work through emotions correlated to such experiences. Artscape Outreach has began to build this bridge.

 

Join the conversation

 

Literacy

Season 7 Episode 34

Wed, 4 Jan 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm, Sat, 7 Jan 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm

The FunDza Literacy Trust is a South African nonprofit dedicated to improving literacy among teens and young adults. Education provides the foundation for a healthy, stable, growth-oriented society – literacy is its cornerstone.

In this episode, we speak to the students of Intshukumo Primary School in Gugulethu township who are currently participating the the Year Beyond Program after school which offers the opportunity to expand reading, English and creative writing skills in partnership with the FunDza! app and curriculum. This program fosters an interest in all things educational with a primary focus on encouraging linguistic and compositional capabilities. For many students in Cape Town townships, the world after school is a distracting and often dangerous place. Some children begin dating at young ages, are asked to join gangs or may even be “flighted by a taxi driver” as one of the students in this episode describes. Opportunities to continue to learn outside of the typical school day are crucial for children and teens who are motivated to move out of the stereotypes of township life.

Join the conversation

Artscape Rural Outreach 2016

Season 7 Episode 33

Wed, 28 Dec 2016 7:30pm 7:30 pm, Sat, 31 Dec 2016 7:30pm 7:30 pm

 

In October 2016, Cape Town’s very own Artscape Theater performed during a special outreach weekend in Clan William. They brought in performers ranging from ballerinas, to hip hop dancers and opera singers. Showcasing their talents to a captivated audience, these performers were given to opportunity to share their love for artistic expression with township locals. Facilitated by Marlene le Roux, this is a highly anticipated event for the community and a multitude of young and old come out for the show.

Every performer has a unique outlook and approach to creativity. Some have even overcome physical disabilities to become professional dancers and are an inspiration for those who are lucky enough to watch their talents unfold onstage. Sharing these insights with individuals from township communities is crucial and, unfortunately, a very rare occurrence. Emphasis on music, art and performance takes a backstage to act of moving through lives filled with poverty, violence and inequality.

Yet, there is merit in creative self-expression that offers a chance to transcend or work through emotions correlated to such experiences. Artscape Outreach has began to build this bridge.

These episodes features the show’s highlights including dance routines, musical solos and behind the scenes preparations. Additionally, we spoke to several of the performers and we hear their first hand opinions on what it means to be a part of Artscape Outreach.

 

Join the conversation

Kwanele- (enough is enough) Part 2

Season 7 Episode 32

Wed, 7 Dec 2016 7:30pm 7:30 pm, Sat, 10 Dec 2016 7:30pm 7:30 pm

In the outskirts of Cape Town, residents of Langa township are faced with detrimental living environments. Faulty electrical wires hang from makeshift homes made of Coca Cola emblazoned tin sheets and flammable tarps. Multiple families share a single faulty toilet while runoff from wetland marshes containing trash and unwanted substances filter through the streets. The same streets where children run unsupervised and barefoot, playing with discarded bits of Styrofoam and kicking wads of plastic wrap through smoking traffic.

When the Street Talk team last visited Langa, we passed men and women dressed in contrasting outfits of faded and bold colours. They primarily stood motionless in doorways on every corner perhaps rendered immobile by the stagnancy of their living conditions.

This is not a new reality. In fact, such dilapidated and haphazard homes have plagued Cape Town land since the construction of townships during South Africa’s apartheid adoption in 1948.  Ringing a “white-only” city center, townships were erected skilfully to pen black and coloured workers in distinct regions surrounded by highways and railways to dishearten the masses into a submissive chronic poverty.

Despite the abolishment of apartheid in 1994, relatively nothing has changed for the communities except a recent surge of outrage from township inhabitants, a few failed housing developments and many unkept promises.

In this episode, we revisit the topic of Langa Housing and hear from new voices and opinions in the community.

Join the conversation

Zuma, Yes or No?

Season 7 Episode 29

Wed, 30 Nov 2016 7:30pm 7:30 pm, Sat, 3 Dec 2016 7:30pm 7:30 pm

On 26 November Street Talk asked locals on Long Street to talk about their opinions on Zuma and the current state of his presidency. Should he Stay or Go?

Join the conversation

Kwanele – broken promises

Season 7 Episode 26

“We marched to the city of Cape Town to submit our grievances to the mayor. We met other government officials and we explained out problems. We were told that the mayor was not available and we could not be answered. We were informed that the mayor was aware of our visit but we never got her. I wonder when we get robbed by government officials what else we can do. We are not just protesting for nothing but to give a voice to our real grievances but they run away. ” “We want them to visit our streets and see that we are human beings like them.”

 

In the outskirts of Cape Town, residents of townships like Langa are faced with detrimental living environments. Faulty electrical wires hang from makeshift homes, neighborhoods share a single toilet while runoff from wetland marshes containing trash and unwanted substances filter through the streets.
This is not a new reality. In fact, such dilapidated and haphazard conditions have plagued Cape Town land since the construction of townships during South Africa’s apartheid adoption in 1948.  Ringing a “white-only” city center, townships were erected skillfully to pen black and colored workers in distinct regions surrounded by highways and railways to dishearten the masses into a submissive chronic poverty.

In this episode, we hear from citizens of Langa as they share the backstory behind their appeal against inadequate housing to Cape Town Mayor Patricia de Lille and the difficulties facing their daily lives.

Join the Conversation

Teenage Parents Part 2

Season 7 Episode 25

Wed, 26 Oct 2016 7:30pm 7:30 pm, Sun, 27 Nov 2016 7:30pm 7:30 pm

“Yes, we do have clinics that provide contraceptives but preventing pregnancy should start at home. If only if our parents would talk to us and sit us down and try to make us to be confident in our skin, in our body…”

According to a survey conducted in 2015,  5.3% of females (14-19) reported they were pregnant at some point during the 15 months prior to the poll. This number indicates that from 2013-2015,  approximately 1,408,833 million teenage pregnancies occurred in South Africa.

Now, to put the number in context, if this total number of females who experienced teenage pregnancy in South Africa were living only in Cape Town, that would be about 37% of the cities total population ( 3,740, 025 million in 2011). Two out of five people in the entire city would be young enough to attend or graduate from primary school and would be carrying at a baby at the same time.

Females make up 51.1% of Cape Towns population at 1,907,412 million people,. With 12% of Cape Town females from ages 15-19 reporting teenage pregnancy in 2011, this means that 228,889 young women had children. This number does not include teenagers from ages 13-14.

While 5.3% of a country the size of South Africa does not immediately appear drastic or alarming, the subsequent issues that result from this number, are. When faced with feeding, clothing, housing and providing for a child, a South African young woman’s education may take an immediate hit in order to generate a constant income. Without a significant income, chronic poverty may become a possibility.

Though some may point toward teenage pregnancy as a failure in society, in all actuality the failure lies in societies slow adoption of sexual education. In addition, the shame and stigma that revolve around teenage pregnancy from religious groups, family as well as schools can directly harm a young woman’s outlook on her pregnancy. Young mothers often raise their children without any aid from the father and turn to their nuclear as well as extended family for support.

With this second episode of Teenage Parents, Street Talk is hoping to encourage young women to step outside of the boundaries of teenage pregnancy by addressing the difficulties of motherhood, providing an opportunity for community support and providing space for the vocalization of each woman’s dream.

Support

Her Voice Foundation

Young Moms Support

The Parent Centre

Join the Conversation

Teenage Parents Part 1

Season 7 Episode 24

Wed, 19 Oct 2016 7:30pm 7:30 pm, Sat, 22 Oct 2016 7:30pm 7:30 pm

“..Sometimes things happen unexpectedly.”

According to a survey conducted in 2015,  5.3% of females (14-19) reported they were pregnant at some point during the 15 months prior to the poll. This number indicates that from 2013-2015,  approximately 1,408,833 million teenage pregnancies occurred in South Africa.

Now, to put the number in context, if this total number of females who experienced teenage pregnancy in South Africa were living only in Cape Town, that would be about 37% of the cities total population ( 3,740, 025 million in 2011). Two out of five people in the entire city would be young enough to attend or graduate from primary school and would be carrying at a baby at the same time.

Females make up 51.1% of Cape Towns population at 1,907,412 million people,. With 12% of Cape Town females from ages 15-19 reporting teenage pregnancy in 2011, this means that 228,889 young women had children. This number does not include teenagers from ages 13-14.

While 5.3% of a country the size of South Africa does not immediately appear drastic or alarming, the subsequent issues that result from this number, are. When faced with feeding, clothing, housing and providing for a child, a South African young woman’s education may take an immediate hit in order to generate a constant income. Without a significant income, chronic poverty may become a possibility.

Though some may point toward teenage pregnancy as a failure in society, in all actuality the failure lies in societies slow adoption of sexual education. In addition, the shame and stigma that revolve around teenage pregnancy from religious groups, family as well as schools can directly harm a young woman’s outlook on her pregnancy. Young mothers often raise their children without any aid from the father and turn to their nuclear as well as extended family for support.

With this episode, Street Talk is hoping to encourage young women to step outside of the boundaries of teenage pregnancy by addressing the difficulties of motherhood, providing an opportunity for community support and providing space for the vocalization of each woman’s dream.

SUPPORT:

Her Voice Foundation

Young Moms Support

The Parent Centre

Join the Conversation

Dance and Demonstration

#FeesMustFall2016

Hand claps. Whistles. Methodic footsteps and lyrics revealing a deep historical pain erupt from the crowd, commanding the captivated gaze of onlookers.

It is midday on Wednesday, October 5th on the University of Cape Town campus where hundreds of students, university workers and emphatic supporters of the #FeesMustFall2016 movement are gathered in a vibrantly cohesive, buzzing collective of individuals demonstrating their need for fundamental policy changes in the University. A desire for revolution is in the air but, truthfully, the goal is unclear.

Though the true beginning of student-gathered activism in South Africa catalyzed in 1994 with protests led by the South African Student Congress (SASC) inspiring a wave of grassroots defiance against educational policies, South African University protests have resurfaced this year with the #FeesMustFall movement.

Initially, University of Cape Town students gained widespread international attention for their March, 5th 2015 “Rhodes Must Fall” protests. Primary protest demands focused on the removal of a Cecil John Rhodes statue ( the creator of the pre-apartheid labor and tax initiative, The Glen Gray Act)  from campus grounds. The Rhodes statue was torn down a month later. However, the campaign didn’t stop there. Ultimately, protesters shifted the conversation to encompass race relations, financial inequalities as well as detrimental educational methodologies and focused on decolonizing the country’s universities. No progress was made, thus resulting in a new protest wave this year.

From Wits to CPUT to UCT, major universities are experiencing an uproar in some form. At University of Cape Town, the scene has remained relatively calm, however, classes were canceled and the university has been forced to acknowledge protester demands.

When the Street Talk Crew arrived to UCT last week with cameras in hand, ready to cover event and speak with those involved, the university appeared peaceful. Students meandered about without any particular haste. However, police presence began casually gathering along the streets. Laughing and chatting, their demeanor was less threatening than it was relaxed.

Only a few hours later, everything shifted.

Multiple persuasive and rousing speeches from the appointed leaders of the #FeesMustFall dissent incited an entire assembly of individuals to take to the campus walkways. Toyi-toyi  singing and dancing broke out within the group, some demonstrators waved small tree branches above their heads and one held a white cross at the forefront. From a distance, the accumulation could have appeared to be a lighthearted parade. Yet, it was far from a celebration.

As we moved from the outskirts of campus towards the center, a large scorch mark marring the ground of UCT’s upper campus. Coupled with what appeared to be ashes of paper and trash, the blemish confirmed online reports of arson that had taken place on campus just the night before.

The crowd halted in front of the Steve Beiko building, demanding UCT Principal Max Price’s attention. Police arrived in full gear, helmets and weapons in place, and stared with a stony countenance towards the peaceful group. Throughout the demonstration, a select group of students stood out at the front lines of the marching masses. Their authority in the protest was clear. As a result, we asked to speak with them for our next episode of Street Talk TV.


What ensued was an hour-long conversation between six UCT students that revealed their unanimous rage and pain. The dynamic between the students and the police, who stood only 20 feet away, was shown to be highly tumultuous and further increased anger as the students spoke to us. While our crew held cameras, notebooks and microphones at the ready, we noticed a cluster of protesters intently listening behind us.

At the end of the day, the Street Talk crew looked around at each other, felt the adrenaline of the day vanish and sunk into exhaustion. We agreed that it is easy to allow yourself to be swept up in the passion and power of an oppressed group. Compassion morphs into guilt and subsequent need to aid as well as act. As media, our job is instead to share the story as it unfolds before us. The “Everything Must Fall” episode is our way of distilling the events and adding the crucial conversation that is spreading across the country.

#FeesMustFall is a convoluted issue that lacks a singular solution. In the meantime, violence, property damage and fear mongering from any party cannot be the answer and instead, we can only  encourage knowledge, empathy and compromise.

-Angelina Hess

Join The Conversation


Stills





Stills





[/types

EverythingMustFall

Season 7 Episode 23

Wed, 12 Oct 2016 7:30am 7:30 am, Sun, 16 Oct 2016 7:30am 7:30 am

“I am a very very very hurt black person by this institution. I came to UCT in 2012, almost 5 years, and nothing has changed in this university despite the demands of Rhodes Must Fall up until today. Nothing has changed. Even me, sitting like this and talking to you, I might get suspended again by the university. So black pain, that’s my reason for being here.” -Lindiwe Dlamini

On Wednesday, October 5th hundreds of students, university workers and emphatic supporters of the #FeesMustFall2016 movement gathered on the University of Cape Town campus in a vibrantly cohesive, buzzing collective of individuals demonstrating their need for fundamental policy changes. This is is a conversation between six of the protesters present at the demonstration.

Join the Conversation

No News is Good News!!

Season7 Episode 14

Fri, 20 Jan 2017 7:30pm 7:30 pm

Join the conversation

“The role of a public broadcaster in a democracy is a critical one. The SABC at the moment has the ability to undermine the strength of our democracy.”

On July 1st, 2016 the public and journalists protested against the censoring of news on the public broadcaster, SABC. In this episode, we asked protestors on the street to share their opinions with us. In addition, we continue our conversation with the individuals from Season 7 Episode 13 “Why Vote?” to discuss censorship.

 

Why Vote?

Season 7 Episode 13

Fri, 20 Jan 2017 7:15pm 7:15 pm

Join the conversation

“There are more negative things we face as young people here in South Africa than the positive”

“I would rather sell my soul to the devil than to vote for ANC”

“I have never voted, I see no reason in voting. For me, voting it’s as if I unconsciously take away my own power and give it to some man or some woman to abuse it.”

Four individuals discuss political division, frustration with government corruption and the importance of finding your voice without casting a vote. They reveal that they feel neither the younger nor the elder generation is reflected in South Africa’s current political landscape. 

The Gang Killed My Son

Season 7 Episode 11

Gangsterism is a much discussed topic in South Africa, but although there is much discussion about gangsters, there is little talk about the people who raised them and the tragedies that they have witnessed. Street Talk TV spoke with a few parents of gangsters to find out how they perceived the problem of gangsterism in South Africa and how it could be solved. Many of the parents in this episode had experienced the death of a child due to their child’s involvement with gangs, and were eager to prevent other parents from experiencing the same grief.

 

Join the conversation

Brothers for All

Season 7 Episode 10

 

Fri, 6 Jan 2017 7:30pm

In this episode, ex-offenders discuss their work with the organization “Brothers For All” where they mentor at risk youth to keep them out of prison. They teach high school dropouts, teenage mothers, unemployed youth and ex- offenders how to do computer programming, coding, graphic design, entrepreneurship and digital marketing. We hear about life before, during and after prison and why they are motivated to help others.

Inferior Education post Apartheid

Season 7 Episode 9

Fri, 6 Jan 2017 7:15pm

 

 

Join the conversation

“Why as blacks South Africans,we have to campaign and toyi-toyi all the time in order for us to get justice in this country,in order for us to be equal?.”

“We get to learn in cold classes and one child might say what is the use of  living my warm bed and,it even get’s to a point of children dropping out of school.”

Join this group of education and discuss how best we can make our education work for all of us.

Gogo Diaries

Season 7 Episode8

Fri, 30 Dec 2016 7:30pm

Join the conversation

“The worst children are the girls,if you can see the girls the way they are drinking.I’ve got only girls and they are all drinking”.

“I see a lot of grannies struggling with grandchildren,that is not fair guys because we are human beings too and we are suppose to rest”

It’s often said that society is measured by how best they treat old people not to fear the young or be deserted by them.Are we cheating our old citizen of the love,security and comfort they deserve?.

Dis Ability!

Season 7 Episode 7

Join the conversation

“When I think about my family everyone felt powerless and went into denial. It was very hard for my family to accept that I was disabled, because accepting that I’m disabled, would be accepting all the financial burden.”

“As disabled people, we need to do more, stop waiting for able bodied people in power to give us power. We need to take our power”.

An inspirational conversation by  intellectuals from UCT, tell of the challenges that come with their disability and how they have turned their challenges to Abilities.

 

Born frees

Season 7 Episode 6

Fri, 30 Dec 2016 7:15pm

Join the conversation

“We are not equal as born frees, because you check at Model C schools they are more advanced, we are not the same as learners.”

“It’s a very difficult situation where we grow up in the township, but they insist not help our schools with maybe sponsor because they have been through what we have been through”

Do you think Born frees are Free?  or they  are exposed to their own challenges. Share your views.

In quest for Land

Season 7 Episode 5

Fri, 23 Dec 2016 7:15pm

 

Women on Abuse

Season 7 Episode 4

Fri, 16 Dec 2016 7:30pm

Join the conversation

“Yes I have lived with domestic violence, a beautiful mother and a beautiful father but a weakness that got expressed via my father in beating my mother”.

“That is not to say I have not  experienced as a young women incredible levels of abuse, which is endemic, in other words it is so much part of our worlds not just here locally on the Cape Flats, but everywhere in the world. It is planetary”.

These women unpack the experiences of  abuse they encountered with; their partners , members of their immediate families and other people in their communities.

 

Brutality towards Rastas

Season 7 Episode 3

Fri, 16 Dec 2016 7:15pm

 

Join the conversation

As rastafari we are made scapegoats for the problems that exists within society,whereas our way of life is the solution to the problems.”

“As rastafari are not apologetic about who we are, in fact we are rejecting babylonian ways and adopting ancient simplistic ways.We are targeted because of that.”

Racism

Season 7 Episode 2

Fri, 9 Dec 2016 7:30pm

 

Join the conversation

“I say to my granddaughters,I don’t think I will love you with a black person in my house.”

“From now to ten years forward,If the government does not change and give equal rights to everyone,there will be war.”

Racism

Season 7 Episode 1

Fri, 9 Dec 2016 7:15pm

 

Join the conversation

“There is racism between blacks and coloured, maybe because history has caused that racism culture, like they say coloureds don’t really have a place in South Africa but in history the coloureds were always there.”

“Everyone is equal, you’ve got these blocks: black, white, coloureds, that just don’t make sense to me. We are all equal, so why you wanna separate us as people.”

“Now that the black are in power the opportunities are coming to blacks.”

Join into this conversation and help build a human race.

UCT on Fire

Season 6 Episode 52

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 12:00am

Join the conversation

UCT students tell of their struggles and the measures they have to take to get their demands met by the UCT management and by the government.

Baphumelele Children’s Home

Season 6 Episode 51

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 12:00am

 

For some having a shelter over their heads is just a luxury and having parents or family is just a norm. That is not the case with many young and fragile lives at Baphumelele Children’s Home in Khayelistha. Founded by Mama Rosie whose motherly instinct kicked in when she saw young children from her area roaming the streets and no one tending to their needs while their parents were working.

Little did Rosie know that she will be opening her small house to a pool of vulnerable children,swapping her children’s comfortable space and making room for the newly found members who were abandoned either on the cold on her door step.

ArtsCape Outreach 2016

Season 6 Episode 50

 

To try and borrow from how John Lennon saw an artist’s role in society: is to try and express what we all feel. Not to tell people how to feel. Not as a preacher, not as a leader, but as a reflection of us all.

This was the aim and successfully executed plan for Artscape team when they organised an outreach programme for art barrel community with limited opportunities.

They woke up a sleeping town and not only brought life with their art but breathed life into that community.

State of the Nation

Season 6 Episode 48

Tue, 13 Jun 2017 12:00am

 


Join the conversation

Bringing Change

Season 6 Episode 49

Tue,16 Feb 2016 7:30pm

 

 

We all have an idea of the kind of society we deserve to live in .The kind of country we possibly deserve to be citizens of!,but not all of have that much courage to share with the world of what is it we need to do,have or where we need to be in order to be citizens in that preferred country.

While others speak from an outside position looking,this group of activists from Khayelitsha are not shy to dish away recommendations of how best do they think that as Society we can remedy our political landscape not miraculously of cause by actively bringing the change we yearn for as stakeholders in our societies,possibly communities and of course the world.

Bread For Life

Season 6 Episode 43

Tue, 6 Jun 2017 12:00am

Artscape Outreach in Worcester

Season 6 Episode 41

Thu, 1 Jun 2017 12:00am

On October 19th, ARTSCAPE, Cape Town’s no 1 centre of arts and culture,went to Worcester on its annual cultural outreach to the rural areas of the Western Cape.

Spearheaded by Marlene Le Roux, arts director, Artscape took some of its finest performances in music, dance and ballet for a two day jamboree in Worcester’s Town Hall.

School children were bused in from the surrounding areas for two performances on each of the two days festival.The last evening culminated in a gala performance attended by town dignitaries, farmers, residents from surrounding towns.

Marlene and a group of performers discuss how what they are doing can really change people’s minds by breaking down a lot of the cultural isolation so many of our communities still live in. Children, who have never heard opera or seen ballet are transfixed by the experience. And filming the audience faces as they watched a wild and brilliant dance performed by four disabled people, two in wheelchairs,you sense that their perception of the word “disabled” will never be the same !

Join the Conversation

Masiphumelele

Season 6 Episode 40

Tue, 24 Nov 2015 7:30pm, Sat, 28 Nov 2015 7:30pm

The people of Masiphumelele posess a vibrant spirit despite the debilitating influences of crime, alcoholism, drug abuse and other illness. Closer integration of these people into the relatively affluent local communities will enhance the lives of all in the area.And these resident were discussing issues they face in Masiphumelele.

Join the Conversation

Hands Off Our Grant March

Season 6 Episode 38

Thu, 25 May 2017 12:00am


On the 15 of October hundreds of gogos and young women joined hands in a protest in front of St. George’s Cathedral.

The march was organised by Black Sash and Right To Know.

They were challenging the unlawful,fraudulent and immoral business practices facilitated by the current outsourced SASSA/CPS contract for the payments of social grant.

Saying they refused to remain silent about the hardship and struggles of poor and vulnerable people affected by these unauthorised and often fraudulent deductions. As a result beneficiaries experience food shortages and are unable to take their medicines. Many, particularly in rural communities,struggle to find recourse,spending extra money on transport and airtime, often with little success.

A group of the seven protesters gave vent to their anger and determination to stop this practice in a lively and moving conversation filmed after the demo.

Join the Conversation

Fees Must Fall March

Season 6 Episode 37

Thu, 25 May 2017 12:00am

For a week the universities of the Western Cape and the rest of the country were in turmoil.

Tens of thousand of students protested against the government’s announcement that they were going to increase the fees for tertiary education.

Campuses were shut down. Lectures cancelled and riot police shot water cannon,tear gas, rubber bullet and stun grenades at protesting students.

Street Talk took its cameras to parliament where the police use violence against the students marchers and then later recorded a conversation between seven students protesters who discuss the issues behind the march and what they think the University administrations and government must do.

Join the Conversation

Bullying in school

Season 6 Episode 35

Tue, 23 May 2017 12:00am

 

A group of leaners from 3 different school in Cape Town are discussing Bullying they find in schools amongst fellow learners and teachers.

Join the Conversation

Anti Corruption March

Season 6 Episode 36

Tue, 23 May 2017 12:00am

Six activist who share their views on the rampant corruption in South Africa,saying if our leaders weren’t so corrupt we would live in a better South Africa. They argue that it’s not only our government that is corrupt, it also happens in the private sector.

Join the Conversation

Artscape High School Drama

Season 6 Episode 34

Thu, 18 May 2017 12:00am

The Brackenfell students are discussing racism and how it affects them. They also tell how they can’t even go and study where they want because of the racial war we have here in South Africa. They also discuss how important it is to take responsibility for your own life and not blame the government for everything that is wrong. They maintain that if a white person calls a black person ” stupid ” it’s a racist remark, but if a white person calls another white person stupid, it’s not.

Join the Conversation

Racism in Schools

Season 6 Episode 32

Tue, 16 May 2017 12:00am

 

A group of leaners from 3 different school in Cape Town are discussing racism they find in schools amongst fellow learners and teachers.

Join the conversation

Artscape High School Drama

Season 6 Episode 33

Thu, 18 May 2017 12:00am

Brackenfell High School Drama students share their views about drama, how it has helped their lives and how drama is perceived in the community and the support they get from their families.

Love, Lust and Lies

Sex Talk Episode 3

 

In the 3rd episode of Sex talk entitled, Love, Lust and Lies, Kgomotso and our celeb panelists probe the underlying social issues that inform our sexual choices, exploring the many varying elements in the love spectrum. Why do we lie? And what exactly separates love from lust.

Join the Conversation

What My Parents Never Told Me

Sex Talk Episode 2

 

What did your parents tell you about the Birds and the Bees?…Or more importantly, what did they not tell you? In What My Parents Never Told Me, Kgomotso Matsunyane asks our celeb panellists to rehash those awkward talks with parents, taking the wrong advice about sex from friends and why we as a society are so hesitant to talk openly about sex.

Join the Conversation

African Immigrants on living in South Africa

Season 6 Episode 31

Tue, 16 May 2017 12:00am

For many African migrants, immigration is a necessity not a choice; some fleeing due to violent circumstances and dire economic straits. We asked a group of African Immigrants to share their experiences of living in South Africa, how their lives have improved or deteriorated since immigrating, and the challenges they face in a country where they are largely unwelcome.

Join the Conversation

Soup Kitchen Khayelitsha

Season 6 Episode 26

Thu, 4 May 2017 12:00am

 

“We saw the poverty in Khayelitsha, especially in the informal settlements. We just decided we have to do something about it, even if it’s small…..even if it’s out of our own pockets”

Khayelitsha, which means New Home in isiXhosa, is a township allocated on the Cape Flats, and is a remnant of the atrocious Apartheid system. Not much has changed since, with residents walking up to 200 meters or further just to access water. The Meals on Wheels team based in Khayelitsha could not sit back and watch the tremendous poverty pervading the populace. The team estimate feeding approximately 30 000 people per month, and yet, this is not enough.

Join the conversation

HIV Defaulting Part 2

Season 6 Episode 22

Sat, 25 Jul 2015 8:30pm

‘Reality is, you meet [someone]…..you get butterflies….everything goes very [fast]….no condoms, no one is thinking about them….you both don’t know your HIV status, and even if you are both HIV negative, there are STIs…its not easy”

“Sometimes, it’s hard to disclose, you don’t know what the person is going to think about you”

In the second installment of HIV Defaulters, the group discusses the social realities of the HIV virus; the tremendous fear of rejection when disclosing to a new love, the stigma from your community, and the consequences of being dishonest in relationships.

Join the conversation

Reddam House

Season 6 Episode 20

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 12:00am

 

“Why are so many black people still living in the slums……when we’ve had the laws to facilitate growth and progression for twenty years…not much has happened in those twenty years”

South Africa is considered to have one of the most progressive constitutions in the world, and yet the country is wrought with social, political and economic challenges. A sentiment shared by the Matriculants of Reddam House Altantic Seaboard. In this episode they share their views on racism, class structure and poor service delivery in our country.

Join the conversation

Heidelberg Residents

Season 6 Episode 19

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 12:00am

 

“This is my town, I was born here and I’m not going anywhere”

“People always say, when you go to Cape Town you have to stay indoors….you can’t even watch a fight….you could get shot just watching”

Heidelberg is a small town located near South Africa’s south coast, about half way between Cape Town and Knysna. We sat down with a few domino playing residents, some who have called Heidelberg home for over 40 years. They share the joys and woes of small town life. Despite the high rate of unemployment, these residents couldn’t see themselves living anywhere else.

Join the conversation

To Test or Not to Test

Season 6 Episode 18

Sat, 27 Jun 2015 7:00pm

 

Join the conversation

Looking Back: Retirees Reflect

Season 6 Episode 17

Tue, 16 Jun 2015 7:00pm

 

Join the conversation

Teens Talk State of the Nation

Season 6 Episode 16

Tue, 18 Apr 2017 7:00pm

Join the conversation

Teens Talk Dating

Season 6 Episode 15

Tue, 18 Apr 2017 12:00am

Join the conversation

Rhodes Must Fall

Season 6 Episode 14

Tue, 26 May 2015 9:00pm

 

“UCT has been a very elitist, very white supremacist institution and exalting figures like Cecil John Rhodes just instills that message…we are trying to create a University environment that all students can find pride in”

“In many ways we’ve seen some degrees of diversity on campus but does that mean that we have cultural acceptance? Does that mean that we have social acceptance? Does it mean that all cultures, values, viewpoints and traditions are valued equally?”

Imperialist, colonialist and tyrant? For many, the legacy of Cecil John Rhodes conjures images of white supremacy and oppression, these are the sentiments shared by the UCT students campaigning for the removal of the statue of Cecil John Rhodes from their campus. But their vision for change far surpasses that of the mere removal of a symbol of past injustice. Ultimately, the students are seeking to escalate social and economic change across the sectors of their university becoming a model for much-needed change throughout the country.

Join the conversation

SA Youth: Politicians Not For Us

Season 6 Episode 12

Thu, 13 Apr 2017 12:00am

 

“You are privileged to be staying in South Africa because there are countries far worst than us, but the problem is our leaders are very corrupt”

“…starting a political party is business and that’s South Africa, its all about business not about people”

A civil duty or an utter waste of time? Listening to these four South African youths one could easily come to the conclusion that they have lost all faith in the electoral process, largely blaming a so called failing and corrupt government. But what about the power of the voter? Watch this episode as our participants discuss corrupt politics, current and past leadership and the power (or lack thereof) of the vote.

Join the conversation

Battered Women’s Rights Ignored

Season 6 Episode 10

Thu, 16 Apr 2015 10:00pm

 

Klapmuts, a small village between Kraaifontein and Paarl, has experienced an abnormal amount of crime. Most alarming is the amount of violent acts inflicted on the women of Klapmuts. In this episode, 4 brave women share their tragic stories – in the hopes of raising awareness around these disturbing occurrences.

Join the conversation

Elders Blame Democracy

Season 6 Episode 2

Thu, 19 Mar 2015 10:00pm

“In the Apartheid days, we knew our rules. We knew where we couldn’t go but I’m telling you, those were the best years. I wish that could come back”

“….it was better days, we weren’t scared”

The more things change, as they say, the more they stay the same. Not for these older persons from Parkwood Estate. They reminisce on the ‘good’ bad old days and concur that despite the great oppression suffered during the Apartheid era, times were better. One of the most absurd conclusions but can it be justified?

 

Join the conversation

Metro Rail or Metro Fail?

Season 5 Episode 52

Thu, 12 Mar 2015 10:00pm

Everyday, Metrorail transports up to 2 million passengers – with ticket prices ranging from R7.00 – R9.00 for a single ride, one can only imagine the profits made, but why such poor service? Metrorail has become infamous with overcrowding, unsafe and possibly life threatening conditions. In this episode, the Public Transport Voice, a group campaigning for major improvement for all Metrorail passengers, discuss the poor conditions and their strategy on how to bring about change.

 

Join the conversation

 

 

 

Mechanisms of the Mind: Destigmatizing Mental Illness

Season 5 Episode 51

Tue, 10 Mar 2015 10:00pm

“A mental health problem is like any other problem, it can be overcome….with reaching out to others, with growing in self confidence and self-esteem, but generally people are very ignorant”

According to a study conducted by the South African Anxiety and Depression Group, a 1/3 of South Africans suffer from some form of mental disorder. Often ridiculed, largely misunderstood and heavily stigmatized, mental illness is consigned only to those who suffer from it; an invisible disability. With the help of Fountain House, a community based rehabilitation centre, a few fearless individuals spoke to us about living with a mental disorder.

Join the conversation

 

Freedom from Violence: A possibility?

Season 5 Episode 50

Thu, 5 Mar 2015 10:00pm

UNA-SA is a non-governmental organisation whose objective is to support the principles, goals and programmes of the United Nations (UN). Working in partnership with other organisations to promote peace and harmony, as well as economic, social and cultural progress in South Africa. We filmed members from the organisation as they spoke about their Freedom from Violence Project.

 

Join the conversation

The Watchmen of Gugulethu

Season 5 Episode 49

Tue, 3 Mar 2015 10:00pm

“The fact that we are in close proximity to the mall and we have several schools that are situated within the area….it attracts all sorts of criminals to this area, so it was very important for us to start doing something….”

“There are no hidden agendas, we don’t want rewards for what we’re doing. We’re doing this because we are concerned about our community”

A group of men from Gugulethu were tired of the ceaseless theft, violence and crime in their neighbourhood, so they decided to take action, forming a neighbourhood watch group called the Khanya Safety Patrol. Each night they put their lives on the line, patrolling the streets of Gugulethu, ensuring the safety of their community members. Their motivation: seeing their community grow from a township to a thriving suburb.

Join the conversation

Women Farm Workers Rise Up

Season 5 Episode 44

Tue, 3 Feb 2015 10:00pm

“The main reason we started the strike it was because at that stage it was very, very, very difficult living on the farms, struggling on the farms with a R69…..R69 means living from hand to mouth. We couldn’t eat proper, we couldn’t even send our children to school proper”

Two years ago the farmlands of the Western Cape were hit by a series of strikes. Farm workers demanded a pay increase; from a laughable R69 a day to the more reasonable – but still absurd – R100 a day. The strike was led by five female farm workers from De Doorns; a small town in the Cape Winelands District. Dubbed ‘The Big Five’, these lionhearted women talk about their struggle to secure a liveable wage and better working conditions for themselves and their co-workers.

Join the conversation

Constitution Under Fire

Season 5 Episode 41

Thu, 22 Jan 2015 10:00pm

“Corruption started the day after van Riebeeck arrived, and Cecil Rhodes only carried it further. So we have a whole legacy of corruption, in the white era as well as the post-Apartheid era”

“….the ordinary person can engage in a political forum, and for me that’s what we are lacking; the active citizen in our democracy”

Corruption, The Constitution of South Africa, the Secrecy Bill and accountability within Government; just a few of the topics of conversation our participants touched on in Constitution Under Fire. Featuring Cape Talk’s Africa Melane and anti-arms deal campaigner, Terry Crawford-Browne.

Join the conversation

Indlu Yengwevu

Season 5 Episode 40

Tue, 20 Jan 2015 10:00pm

“The Constitution of South Africa we haven’t got any input there…the Constitution has been drafted by the experts…they make the Constitution on behalf of finance and industry…they don’t care about the growth of our children, they don’t care about our cultures. Everything has been destroyed….we are trying our best but there’s nothing”

In our modern times, the elderly are ill regarded. Their wisdom goes unheeded and the lessons they have learned have no special place in our fast paced existence. In this episode, a few older persons from Harare share their wealth of knowledge on how to improve South Africa.

 

Join the conversation

Gay Marriage

Season 5 Episode 35

Thu, 1 Jan 2015 10:00pm

“For me getting married….it protects me…its written down [that] I’m in a relationship with this person….as gay people we are experiencing that if your partner passes away the family will come and demand his stuff but we were in a relationship so we were sharing”

“…the question is how are you going to make a baby, because if you are in a relationship and you are not producing [people ask] why are you in a relationship…that’s the stereotype in communities…if you are not producing [it] is not a relationship”

“…everything that people understand about other people is based on this gender binary. The gender binary is saying…there are real men and there are real women”

To date, South Africa is the only country in Africa to legalize same-sex marriage. Despite this progressive development we remain locked into unchangeable and unmoving ideas about sexuality and gender. Five members of the LGBTI society exchange personal experience of same-sex marriage and confrontations with being legitimized, accepted, recognized. Their honest reflection forces us to consider: How much of what we believe about the world is self determined and how much of it comes to us preordained?

 

Join the conversation

 

Botswana Legabibo Part 2

Season 5 Episode 32

Tue, 23 Dec 2014 10:00pm

“I don’t think the issue of leaving our parents dreams is unique to the gay community, I think its generally a problem….but its gets more problematic within gay communities”

“…gay is my orientation and not my identity…I’m a lot of other things more than just gay….people will like you and some won’t, people will accept you, some won’t…but the most important thing is realising being gay is just one of those things…there’s more to life than being gay”

In part two of Botswana Legabibo, the group go into just how complicated family dynamics can become when disclosing your sexual orientation. They also delve into issues of identity; asking, ‘Does being gay make you a second rate citizen? They conclude that sexual orientation is but one aspect in an entire spectrum that comprises the individual.

Join the conversation

 

Botswana Ub-Legabi

Season 5 Episode 28

 

Tue, 9 Dec 2014 10:00pm

“Its not really a choice, to be gay. It’s you expressing your inner self, your feelings in every way and not being limited”

“….sometimes we try to force people to accept what is happening…..for them its difficult as well, first other members of the family are going to talk…from there its society, from the society it’s the law of the country itself and the world”

“I saw myself being like this and I wanted to destroy this inner me, but I failed… and I don’t want to do that, I want to live life on this earth just like everyone else”

In this episode, members of LGBTI society, UB-LEGABI addresses the initial difficulty of accepting themselves and being themselves in a society that fundamentally rejects them. They talk about the importance of self-acceptance in the face of pressures to conform to traditional standards.  An inspiring talk on the importance of staying true to who you are.

Join the conversation

Botswana Legabibo Part 1

Season 5 Episode 26

Tue, 2 Dec 2014 10:00pm

“In Botswana being gay is not a criminal offense, but the sexual practice, same sex sexual conduct is criminalised….but it’s not gay people who want their lives to be out in the open, it’s the law yanking their lives from the privacy of their home into the public platform because now the personal has become political”

“What does my body have to do with the rest of the country, what I do with my body should not be an issue of national debate “

We teamed up with LEGABIBO, Botswana’s primary LGBT rights organization and filmed an impactful conversation on the current stance of Gay rights in Botswana. They also disclose their own personal experiences of being gay in a society which has not only rejected homosexuality but that has also criminalised it.

 

Join the conversation

Born Frees

Season 5 Episode 18

Tue, 4 Nov 2014 10:00pm

“We all have to realise that we have a civil duty…we can make a change, we can start businesses, we can become entrepreneurs. We have to look at the bigger picture….its not just simply about the government and the citizens but the citizens and the citizens…..we looking at the problems poking at them without coming up with solutions ourselves”

A group of solution orientated and optimistic Law students talk passionately about the future of the country, the personal responsibility we all have as citizens of a democratic country and the “South African Experience”.

Join the conversation

 

 

 

Police Brutality

Season 5 Episode 7

Thu, 25 Sep 2014 10:00pm

Join the conversation

 

Poo Protesters

Season 5 Episode 4

Sat, 28 Feb 2015 10:00pm

What would drive a respectable mother of four to carry a bucket full of shit on her head all the way from her shack in Barcelona to Cape Town International Airport, or the N2 or the House of Parliament and dump its contents in full public view ?  When you listen to this group of Barcelona Shit Protestors you can understand the frustration and anger behind such a radical act : the humiliation of having to poo in front of your kids, the ever present stink, the assault on their dignity…. as one woman puts it ” The only weapon we have to make Helen Zille to give us flush toilets is our shit !”

Join the conversation

Abused Men

Season 4 Episode 51

Sat, 22 Mar 2014 5:00pm

Men are always the bad guys – right ? Men beat up women, rape children, never support their wives or partners’ kids and spend all their money on drinks or drugs. True? Not if you listen to this group of abused men from Vrygrond. According to them, thanks to the Constitution, women have all the rights now, and men none. The tell tragic stories of how their women have stolen from them to buy drugs, beaten them, lied to them, been unfaithful and when the guys have gone to the police they have just been laughed at and told to go back and give their woman a good hiding.”

Join the conversation

Voice of the Voters

Season 4 Episode 49

Wed, 19 Mar 2014 5:00pm

” What we need is that which was taken from us – and that is the land – and we’re never going to get that because voting is a neo-liberal rictual !”  ” Voting is a necessary evil ” ” The only solution if for people to organize themselves on the ground and not wait for the politicians…” ” Can we believe in a democracy that was pushed on us without our permission ?”  Dissonant voices, passionate debate in a build-up to the May elections.

Join the conversation

Spanking

Season 4 Episode 48

Sat, 15 Mar 2014 5:00pm

Spare the rod and spoil the child?  The ANC is going to make it against the law to physically punish your children and has mothers and grannies all over the country up in arms. ” This man, Zuma, can’t just come into my house and tell me how to bring up my children ”  ” If you can’t smack them they end up on the street doing drugs and all those things…” Traditionally children have been beaten when they misbehave and it is the belief of many women that without that option, the kids will have no respect for their elders and just do what they want. ” Just talk to the teachers in the schools and they will tell you how the kids behave when you can’t punish them…”

Join the conversation

Wine addicts

Season 4 Episode 45

Sat, 8 Mar 2014 5:00pm

Before you order that next double, check out these drunks from Samora Machel. Their stories of humiliation, degradation, despair and dysfunctionality are enough to put anyone on the wagon. Self aware, self pitying and self loathing there is no action too base they wouldn’t take if it’ll get them the next dop.

Join the conversation

 

 

Challenging the Patriarchy Part 1

Season 4 Episode 44

Thu, 6 Mar 2014 5:00pm

Three successful professional women discuss the gender issues that bedevil our society. How much equality is there really between the sexes ? ” There is no such thing as the head of a household….. you may be a CEO at the office but just a woman at home….” ” Women are perceived as being the neck, men the head…” these ladies are nobody’s ” necks” and they passionately argue for real equality between the sexes in the workplace, the marketplace and in bed.

Join the conversation

School Teachers

Season 4 Episode 43

Wed, 5 Mar 2014 5:00pm

These teachers at Masiphumele Primary School declare that if you don’t have the passion and commitment for teaching, better find another job. Inspiring children to learn, maintaining discipline and coping with classes of over 40 kids is just part of the problem. The most difficult, they say, is trying to involve parents in the education of their kids. With unemployment, poverty and hunger rife, what happens outside the school can undo everything the teachers are trying to achieve…

Join the conversation

Black Women Equality Part 1

Season 4 Episode 42

Sat, 1 Mar 2014 5:00pm

We don’t have balls, we don’t need balls. We’re competent, hard working and ambitious….” Young and successful professional women question whether the equal rights enshrined in our Constitution actually apply  to women in the workplace. ” My boss grabbed me and gave me a big slurpy kiss, which I really didn’t want. I grabbed his nuts and squeezed. It felt good – really good. “

Join the conversation

 

Voice of the Voters Part 1

Season 4 Episode 41

Thu, 27 Feb 2014 5:00pm

Racialism, non-racialism and blackness – these are some of the issues that young people struggle with when it comes to voting in the up-and-coming elections. Who can they choose that best represents them and their aspirations in a corrupt society.

Join the conversation

District Six and Inequality

Season 4 Episode 17

Wed, 29 Jan 2014 6:45pm

Old time residents of District 6, Cape Town reminisce about the good old days before the apartheid regime evicted them and destroyed their homes. Memories differ: some saying that coloured and blacks lived harmoniously side by side, others claim the opposite. All agree that what happened to them was a crime and that they are still waiting for the government to facilitate their return.

Join the conversation

 

Right2Know Campaign

Season 4 Episode 11

Wed, 8 Jan 2014 6:45pm

 

The Right2Know campaign was formed in the wake of the Government’s introduction of the Secrecy Bill. What are your thoughts on the right to Freedom of Information in this country?

 

Join the conversation

Zuma’s Painting

Season 3 Episode 46

 

People from the streets of Cape Town react to the painting of President Zumas penis.

Join the conversation

Male Rights

Season 3 Episode 26

 

Wed, 16 Apr 2014 5:30pm

Everyone has heard about the abuse of women, but what about men who are abused by women. What are their rights ?

Join the conversation

 

Equal Education

 Season 3 Episode 13

 

After demonstrating in front of Parliament, a group from Equal Education tell what they think has to be done to bring proper education to government schools.

Join the conversation

 

 

Maryland adult literacy

Season 3 Episode 7

 

Maryland is an adult literacy centre in the middle of Hanover Park, one of Cape Towns most violent townships. Sister Marina tells how it all began and how her upbringing led her to do what she does.

Join the conversation

Tafelsig Backyarders

Season 3 Episode 6

Homeless families are evicted from an abandoned sports field where they have been squatting. Heart rending stories of families trying to survive.

Join the conversation

Right To Know

Season 3 Episode 5

 

The Right 2 Know campaign against the ANC’s attempt to bring in censorship with the Protection of Information Bill. A writer, two journalists and south Africa’s most famous cartoonists strategize on how to stop this happening.

Join the conversation

Views of 2011 Elections

Season 3 Episode 3

 

Middle class white Capetonians discuss the upcoming elections and what they think needs to change.

Join the conversation

Vote or Not to Vote Part 2

Season 3 Episode 2

 

Continuation of episode 1. UCT students debate whether their vote will change anything

Join the conversation

Vote or Not to Vote?

Season 3 Episode 1

 

UCT students debate whether their vote will change anything

 

Join the conversation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

South Africa in the eyes of youth

Season 2 Episode 37

 

UCT students talk about rampant corruption in government and the police and the need for members of the public to know what their legal rights are.

Join the conversation

Youth League Part 2

Season 2 Episode 35

 

A group from Gugs exchange views on censorship, pornography and alcohol abuse.

Join the conversation

The Afrikaaner

Season 2 Episode 33

 

Middle-aged Afrikaners who were once pro apartheid and now support the ANC!

Join the conversation

The Government

Season 2 Episode 32

 

Continuation of episode 28. Right 2 Know group discuss community activism, government’s lack of action on social issues, and how racism still bedevils our society.

Join the conversation

12

Join the conversation

Below each film clip on the website is a Blog where you can share your thoughts and chat with other people.

Take action

Some of the topics that we cover stir up emotions. If you are inspired to act from having seen one of our films, then download our take action manifesto.

If you have an issue/story that you think needs to be told get in touch with us.

Donate

Street Talk TV is run by a non-profit organization (NPO). We survive on funding and donations. If you believe in what we do please consider donating
Make Donation

twitter

connect with us

About Street talk

Street Talk TV – short documentary films about social issues affecting South Africa. Street Talk is produced by ‘Street Stories Films’ a Non-Profit Organisation Reg No: 072-487 NPO.

021 424 8184
streettalk@mweb.co.za

sign up to receive our newsletter

Street Talk Disclaimer

Web design by Yorkhill